A one week, bucket list Lapland Winter Itinerary

I’m sure we all have ideas in the back of our minds about bucket list holidays that we want to take. Often, there is something holding us back though. Is it the potential cost? Or maybe the fact that because the trip has to be just perfect, it needs a lot of careful planning? I’ve had many of these trips in the back of mind that I haven’t taken (yet). One trip I have been keen to take for a very long time is a Lapland winter holiday. Crisp powdery fresh snow, clear skies and the Aurora Borealis dancing through the sky. It’s been a dream of mine for years. Or at least it was, until I decided to plan a one week, bucket list trip to Finnish Lapland.

The pine forests of a Lapland winter

The pine forests of a Lapland winter

I’d often seen magazine and online articles of the famed Glass Igloos of Lapland, and dismissed ever staying at such a place due to the cost. The thing is though, I questioned myself, if it was something I really wanted to do, would I be disappointed with the trip if I missed them out? Would I wish I had done things differently? I started doing some research – plotting and planning options, and discussed budgets with my other half. We both agreed that if the price was right for the entire trip, we’d go for it. We’d compromise on some things, but we’d stay in those Glass Igloos!

This post is a breakdown of the itinerary that we put together for our Lapland winter trip. It includes transport, accommodation, activities and most importantly cost. I’ve also thrown in a few tips of what to bring and what to wear to cope with the seriously low temperatures that you may encounter on your trip. We based our trip around the the town of Saariselkä due to it’s vicinity to Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort, home of the Glass Igloos. So let’s head out on a journey to see frozen forests, cosy log cabins, huskies, reindeer and a search for those elusive Northern Lights.

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links, where I may make a small commission at no additional cost to you. As usual, all opinions are my own.


A one week Lapland Winter Itinerary

Our trip to Lapland was booked for early February. We had considered January for our trip, but as the Saariselkä region is located 250km north of the arctic circle there is a six week period of polar night. This means that from mid December to the end of January, the sun stays below the horizon. We wanted long nights, but also the opportunity to see the pastel hues of winter skies during daylight, so opted for February. As a rough guide, in early February, sunrise was at 9.30am with the sun setting at 3.30pm and a fairly long period of twilight late in the afternoon.

Day One

The travel day. Our flight from Gatwick was booked with Finnair, *scheduled at 12.00pm and due to arrive at Ivalo Airport at 17.30pm,  a 3.5 hour flight time.

A minor glitch

*Our trip didn’t get off to a smooth start. Our flight was cancelled, we had to transfer from London Gatwick to London Heathrow for an evening flight to Helsinki which landed at midnight. A few hours in an airport hotel and a 7.00am flight from Helsinki to Ivalo and we arrived at 8.00am the next morning. Thankfully our airport lounge booking was transferred to Heathrow and Finnair organised all the flight changes and overnight stay. Their service and compensation for this delay was perfectly acceptable. It could have been much worse.

But let’s pretend it didn’t happen

For the purposes of this itinerary, let’s pretend that the flight went smoothly and I’ll tell you how our day should have gone. We had booked the hire car through SixT, who we had used on a previous trip to the Italian Dolomites. Their service was impeccable, so we always try and use them now, provided they do collection and drop off at our airports of choice. Our car for the week was a Volkswagen Polo, complete with winter tyres and ice scrapers etc. With thick snow on the ground, it took a while to get used to the way the car handled the roads, but after a while it was fine.

The journey from Ivalo Airport to Saariselkä is 26km – approximate 40 minutes on the winter roads. Saariselkä  is a small town in Northern Finland surrounded by fells and a perfect base for a Lapland winter break. With a number of hotels and cabin rentals, as well as the unique resorts, there is something to suit all budgets. Santa’s Hotel Tunturi (our intended accommodation) is located in the centre of the town with a choice of rooms and suites. It’s a great base for the town with plenty to explore within walking distance. There are a range of restaurants and bars in the town to choose from.

Cost Breakdown

Airport Lounge: Gatwick / Heathrow Number 1 Lounge – £32.00 per person

Return Flight: London Gatwick to Ivalo with Finnair – £267.00 return flight per person

Car hire for eight days: SixT – £150.00 per person

Accommodation: Santa’s Hotel Tunturi, Saariselkä – £74.50 per person bed & breakfast

Day Two

Day Two (once we arrived) kicked off with a visit to check in at Northern Lights Village for our two night stay. As we were really early, our cabin wasn’t quite ready so we were asked to return back later. This was absolutely fine, as we had exciting plans. We were off to ride the longest toboggan run in Lapland.

The longest Toboggan Run in Lapland

Saariselkä Ski and Sports Resort is on the outskirts of town and has 15 slopes, as well as the toboggan run. We booked a Winterpark ticket which included a two hour lift pass for the chair lift and toboggan rental, then off we headed to the frozen chairlift. A peaceful lift ride with the cold wind biting our faces, we arrived at the top of the fell for an awesome and exhilarating toboggan run back down to the start. We managed three runs with our two hour lift ticket.

The longest toboggan run in Lapland

The longest toboggan run in Lapland

For lunch we chose to head into town and to the Pritti Bar and Restaurant within Santa’s Hotel Tunturi, to at least spend some time there (after the missed first night)! I had a great burger and my first local beer, which went down really well. Once done, we headed back to the Northern Lights Village, to see our Aurora Cabin for the first time.

Aurora Cabin

Having booked well in advance, I had requested a cabin looking out onto the forests (for photography purposes). We were given Cabin Number One – the furthest cabin away on the resort. Keys in hand, we loaded up a toboggan with our luggage outside the reception building and headed on our way up the hill to our temporary new home. This is the easiest way to transport luggage on these types of resorts. There are no bellboys available to deliver bags to your room, although if you have mobility issues you can drive to your cabin to drop off your things.

Interior of the Aurora Cabins at Northern Lights Village

Interior of the Aurora Cabins at Northern Lights Village

Aurora Cabin through a Lensball

Aurora Cabin through a Lensball

The Aurora Cabins were lovely. A modern take on a cosy log cabin, combined with a half domed window looking out towards the forests and up at the Northern Sky. There was a seating area, a mini bar and a full bathroom, although given the relatively small footprint, the shower was kind of above the toilet – more of a wet room (literally) I guess. It was functional though, and with underfloor heating the bathroom floor dried really quickly. The walk from our cabin to the main building was between five and ten minutes.

Ice Restaurant

A quick drink at the main bar (the local beer Lapin Kulta is awesome, by the way) and it was time to head across the way to the Ice Restaurant and Bar. A beautifully lit igloo style room with an ice bar,  ice tables and wooden stools covered with reindeer hide. I would say it was cosy, but at -5C it was a little chilly. Thankfully, with the right clothing, this is fine for an hour or so. There are also blankets supplied that you can wrap yourself up in if you get a little chilly. A three course meal of local dishes and delicacies, washed down with Lapin Kulta and warming coffee, it was a really great experience, but we were ready to head back to the log fires of the main building after an hour or so!

Ice Restaurant at Northern Lights Village

Ice Restaurant at Northern Lights Village

Cost Breakdown

Accommodation: Northern Lights Village (Aurora Cabin) – £230.00 per person (per night) including breakfast and three course dinner

Morning Activity: Saariselkä Toboggan Run – £23.00 per person

Lunch: Santa’s Hotel Tunturi – Pirtti Bar & Restaurant £20.00 per person (approx)

Dinner: Ice Restaurant – £39.00 surcharge per person

For a more in depth review of the Northern Lights Village, take a look at my review post here.

Day Three

A night of cloudy skies (no Northern Lights) and a good sleep, we awoke on Day Three ready for animal related adventures. But first it was time for breakfast. The breakfast offering at Northern Lights Village is a typical European style continental buffet with hot and cold options. There are some local specialities such as the delicious Karjalanpiirakka – google them, they were awesome. We had a short wander around before it was time for our first activity of the day.

A reindeer sleigh ride

The reindeer paddock is on site at Northern Lights Village and just a short walk from the main building. After a brief introduction by the guide about the reindeer, it was time to take our seat in the sleigh, before heading into the forest. Our reindeer safari was the shortest option available at 25 minutes and was a really relaxing experience. We left the paddock and took a circular route around the surrounding forests, taking in the beautiful Lapland winter scenery.

Reindeer Safari through the forest

Reindeer Safari through the forest

Reindeer safari done, it was time for lunch. Lunch is not included within the main price of staying at the Northern Lights Village although there is a great soup and salad buffet available for €15.00 in the restaurant. Complimentary hot drinks are also available throughout the day. It’s also worth noting that it takes about 15 minutes to walk from the main building into Saariselkä, where there are numerous alternative lunch options available.

Husky rides through the frozen forests

The afternoon activity was one I was really looking forward to. We were off to meet the huskies! The Husky Farm where the activity took place was approximately 20 minutes away by shuttle bus transfer, deep in the forest outside of Saariselkä. Having been briefed by one of the dog handlers, it was clear this would be more interactive and not quite as relaxing as the Reindeer Safari. With sleighs made for two – one seated while the other stands, steers and brakes the excitable Sibernian Huskies whisk you off in to the forest yelping and barking excitedly. It turns out that five huskies are not really capable of pulling a combined weight of 30 stone up hills, so there is a lot of help required. Exhausting! It was a wonderful couple of hours with some awesome scenery along the way.

A husky safari through the Lapland wilderness

A husky safari through the Lapland wilderness

Once back at the resort it was time to freshen up, chill at the cabin for a while before heading out for dinner. The buffet dinner menu was on a rotation and featured a wide range of starters, main courses and desserts. The standard and variety of food was excellent, and the room itself was a lovely space to enjoy the evening, with a selection of comfortable seating areas near the roaring log fires for your after dinner drinks.

Following dinner it was back to the Aurora Cabin to gaze up at the skies in the hope of catching a glimpse of the Aurora. You guessed it, cloudy again.

Northern Lights Village at night

Northern Lights Village at night

Cost Breakdown

Accommodation: Northern Lights Village (Aurora Cabin) – £230.00 per person (per night) including breakfast and three course dinner

Morning Activity: Reindeer Express 25 minutes (booked via Northern Lights Village) – £62.00 per person

Lunch: Northern Lights Village Restaurant Kota: Soup & Salad Buffett Lunch – £13.20

Afternoon Activity: Husky Safari 1 hour (booked via Northern Lights Village) – £129.00 per person

Dinner: Northern Lights Village: Restaurant Kota (inclusive) 

Day Four

Day Four arrived and it was time to check out of the Northern Lights Village and head for pastures new. We had decided to head out and explore the wilderness of the Urho Kekkonen National Park. A friend who lives in Finland had recommended visiting the Kiilopää Fell if we were in the area, so we made sure to do this. Located about 16km south of Saariselkä, Fell Centre Kiilopää was a great base to get out and explore the wilderness.

With a range of accommodation options as well as winter activities booking, there was access to hiking trails, cross country skiiing and snowshoeing routes. The road to Kiilopää was a slight detour off the main E75 road that we had been used to navigating. I say road, it didn’t really look like a road as it was so snow packed, but it was an interesting drive and the car coped well given the conditions.

The snowy road to Kiilopää

The snowy road to Kiilopää

Fell Centre Kiilopää exterior shot

Fell Centre Kiilopää

Hotel Niilanpää at Suomen Latu Kiilopää

Our overnight stay was at the Hotel Niilanpää, which was part of the Fell Centre Kiilopää complex. Only 80 metres away from the main Fell Centre building, the hotel had 34 rooms and a couple of apartments. The majority of the rooms were twin rooms with an en-suite shower room. The rooms were fairly basic, but warm and comfortable. Somewhere to sleep and shower – perfectly acceptable and with lovely views from our room out to the back of the hotel, we were happy.  A quick soup and salad buffet lunch at the Kiilopää Restaurant and we were ready to explore.

Hotel Niilanpää exterior shot

Hotel Niilanpää

Hotel Niilanpää twin room

Hotel Niilanpää twin room

The most beautiful winter scenery

Before heading to Lapland, I wondered if I would get bored of the Lapland winter scenery. Snow and pine forests and very little else – would it get to samey? I was so wrong on this. The scenery on the hike to the Ahopää Fell summit was one of the most breathtaking and beautiful scenes I have witnessed. The first section of hike was gentle, along a trail dotted with pine trees laden heavy with snow. An occasional glimpse of some local wildlife and other hikers – but otherwise, pure silence apart from the crunch of powdery snow beneath our feet.

Pete had gone way ahead of me at one point, so it was just me and the wilderness. I’ll admit, I did shed a little tear and it wasn’t because of the bracing cold. Well not that time anyway. If I ever fell in love with a place, this was it. The hike to the summit became steeper and more open, with less trees for shelter. It was colder and there was a chilly wind, but we were rewarded with a beautiful sunset scene that made it worthwhile.

The entrance to the fell trails at Kiilopää

The entrance to the fell trails at Kiilopää

Beautiful Lapland winter scenery at the Kiilopää fell

Beautiful Lapland winter scenery at the Kiilopää fell

Stunning sunset at the Kiilopää fell

Stunning sunset at the Kiilopää fell

Once back down at the Fell Centre, we grabbed coffee and cake for warmth before freshening up for dinner. Dinner was (once again) buffet style at the Kiilopää Restaurant. When I say restaurant, this is more of a cafeteria style area which is functional rather than comfortable. The food was good, they served beer and I was happy. There is also a small supermarket and gift shop onsite if you wanted to grab snacks of drinks for the room. There is also an à la carte restaurant on site which looked lovely, but it was only open on selected evenings.

Cost Breakdown

Accommodation: Suomen Latu Kiilopää, Hotel Niilanpää Twin Room – £60.00 per person including breakfast

Lunch: Kiilopää Restaurant Soup Buffet – £9.00 per person 

Afternoon activity: Kiilopää Hike 

Dinner: Kiilopää Restaurant Dinner Buffet – £20.50 per person

Day Five

Another cloudy night (you know where this is going don’t you?) with a lack of Northern Lights and we were up and ready for more adventures. Having only spent one evening at Hotel Niilanpää we were moving on to our final and most eagerly awaited accommodation of the trip – Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort. Before that though, we had another exciting activity to do, which took us back to the Northern Lights Village. A quick buffet lunch and we were ready for an exciting two hour Snowmobile Safari.

An epic snowmobile journey

Having been safety briefed and kitted out with the required snow suits and helmets, we followed the guide out of Saariselkä and along the snowmobile routes (marked with red X’s). We were really lucky that there was only one other couple on our trip – there can be a group of up to 30 snowmobiles sometimes. The route took us to the frozen fells, deep into the forests and along open stretches of snow where we could pick up speed and get a real feel for it. We covered about 50 km during the journey, with a couple of stopping points where we swapped drivers. It was an awesome experience.

Snowmobile Safari photo opportunity

Snowmobile Safari photo opportunity

Those famous Glass Igloos

The moment we had been waiting for. Time to check into the Kakslauttanen East Village and spend the night in one of the Glass Igloos I’d seen so many photos of during the years. We had only booked one night in an Igloo – I’d done some research and it was clear they weren’t designed for a lengthy stay. Nestled in the forest, the sight of the Glass Igloos was just as magical as I expected it to be. Once again we had to walk to the Glass Igloo’s and bring our luggage by toboggan. A couple of uphill sections were quite tricky, but otherwise it was fine.

The Glass Igloo at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort

The Glass Igloo at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort

The Igloos are functional in size and space, with a small WC to the right as you enter, storage space to the left and two single beds either side of the sleeping area. Simply decorated and with zebra print throws on the beds, the main selling point of these igloos are the views. A 180 degree domed glass ceiling provides unobstructed views of the northern sky. Perfect for those Aurora sightings. For us – perfect to stare up at the clouds!

View from the Glass Igloo at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort

View from the Glass Igloo at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort

Dinner and drinks in evening were at the East Village Kelo Restaurant and Bar. There was an inclusive three course, table service, set menu with a choice of two dishes per course. Mains were generally meat (reindeer) or fish based, and the desserts were fantastic. An à la carte menu was also available as a replacement or supplement to the set menu, at an additional cost. The restaurant was decorated in a rustic log cabin style, with a large roaring fire in the corner. There was also a separate bar area on the lower level.

Cost Breakdown

Accommodation: Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort East Village Glass Igloo – £268.00 per person (per night) including breakfast and three course dinner

Morning Activity: Kiilopää Hike 

Lunch: Northern Lights Village Restaurant Kota: Soup & Salad Buffett Lunch – £13.20 per person

Afternoon activity: Snowmobile Safari 2 hour (booked via Northern Lights Village) – £102.00 per person

Dinner: Kakslauttanen East Village Kelo Restaurant (inclusive)

If you are looking for more information about the Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort, check out my review post here.

Day Six

We fell asleep after gazing up at the clouds from our glass igloo and awoke early the following morning. Frustratingly, the mornings were clear and bright. The skies only seemed to cloud over in the evening when we most wanted them to be clear. We took a walk to breakfast through a beautiful winter wonderland scene. As there are no bathrooms (only a WC and basin) in the East Village Glass Igloos, there is a separate shower block and sauna building where you can freshen up nearby.

Morning views at Kakslauttanen East Village

Morning views at Kakslauttanen East Village

The gorgeous cosy cabins

After checking out of the Glass Igloo, it was time to check into our Large Cabin for the last couple of nights of our Lapland winter trip. The cabin felt huge in comparison to the Glass Igloo. A large open plan space combining kitchen, seating area and bedroom with a king size bed. With a large stone fireplace in the corner of the sleeping area, it felt cosy and rustic. There was a large bathroom that led through to a private sauna. It was lovely.

The deck of the cabin at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort

The deck of the cabin at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort

Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort cabin interior

Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort cabin interior

Exploring Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort

Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort is separated into two villages, located a couple of miles apart. A shuttle service transports guests between them. The East Village is the original and more ‘rustic’ village, whereby the West Village is larger, more modern with far more facilities. We chose to spend some time exploring the West Village and see what facilities were on offer. As well as the main service building which included reception and the restaurant, there was Santa’s Village to explore, an art gallery and Igloo Tower viewing platform. A Planetarium is due to open late in 2019. The West Village is widely spread out and we spent a couple of hours exploring the area.

Exploring the West Village at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort

Exploring the West Village at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort

Beautiful Lapland winter scenes at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort West Village

Beautiful Lapland winter scenes at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort West Village

The Glass Igloo Bar and Aurora Restaurant

We chose to dine on our second evening at the Aurora Restaurant in the West Village. You can eat at either village as part of your inclusive rate, but you must book in advance. A great feature at the West Village is the awesome Glass Igloo Bar, built in the same style as the accommodation Igloos. We had a couple of pre-dinner drinks in here, the lighting is low so that you can get the best views out to the night sky

The Glass Igloo Bar at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort West Village

The Glass Igloo Bar at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort West Village

The Aurora Restaurant is far more modern than Restaurant Kota at the East Village. The menus are similar, but it’s a much larger space to accommodate for the higher number of guests at West Village. We enjoyed the meal and finished off the evening with another drink at the Glass Igloo Bar before taking a shuttle bus back to our cabin.

Cost Breakdown

Accommodation: Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort East Village Large Cabin – £268.00 per person (per night) including breakfast and three course dinner

Lunch: Kakslauttanen West Village Aurora Restaurant: Soup & Salad Buffet Lunch – £13.20 per person

Afternoon activity: Exploring Kakslauttanen West Village

Dinner: Kakslauttanen West Village Aurora Restaurant (inclusive)

Day Seven

Our final full day in Lapland, and still no sign of the Northern Lights. Another cloudy night and no sound of the Aurora Alert which is installed in all the accommodation to wake us. Following breakfast we spent the morning venturing along the trails outside of East Village to experience some more beautiful Lapland winter scenery, before heading back for lunch.

Cross country ski trails at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort East Village

Cross country ski trails at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort East Village

Smoke Sauna and Ice Pool fun (madness)

Our final activity was the Finnish tradition of a smoke sauna and ice swimming. It’s something I had told myself I was determined to do, but questioned whether I actually would. I’m no a fan of getting into cold water, let alone icy cold water! Nevertheless, we took a drive up to Fell Centre Kiilopää, where they have a traditional smoke sauna which is open on selected days of the week. If I’m really honest, I am not really a fan of being too hot either. Great combination for this activity don’t you think?!

The idea is that you spend around ten minutes in the smoke sauna then head outside and take a dip in the ice cold water, where the average water temperature is approx. -1ºC! The sauna was fine at first, until it got busier. As more water got thrown on the wood, the heat became almost unbearable for me, so it was time. Time to head outside and take the dip in the icy cold water. I bravely walked the pathway to the pool and climbed down the steps. Didn’t hesitate – just had to get it done. Gingerly, I waded down the steps, and dipped in as far as my shoulders before instantly turning around and climbing out! I was proud that I had done it, even if I had spent barely any time in the water. If I’m honest, I didn’t really find it enjoyable, but it was exhilarating.

Smoke Sauna and Ice Pool

Smoke Sauna and Ice Pool

Kelo Restaurant

A final dinner at the Kelo Restaurant rounded off our final evening in Lapland, and with a forecast of cleared skies and minor geomagnetic aurora activity, we headed back to our cabin, lit a fire and waited. We stood on the deck of the cabin staring out at the starry skies waiting for a hint of green to appear. But, sadly it didn’t. Not this time anyway. It may seem like a disappointing end to a story, but thanks to everything that we did listed above, we had the most awesome experience. And there’s a very good reason to return now, isn’t there?

Cosy cabin scenes at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort

Cosy cabin scenes at Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort

Cost Breakdown

Accommodation: Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort East Village Large Cabin – £268.00 per person (per night) including breakfast and three course dinner

Morning Activity: Exploring Kakslauttanen East Village

Lunch: Kakslauttanen East Village Kelo Restaurant: Soup & Salad Buffet Lunch – £13.20 per person

Afternoon Activity: Smoke Sauna at Suomen Latu Kiilopää – £11.50 per person

Dinner: Kakslauttanen East Village Kelo Restaurant (inclusive)

Take a more detailed look at the activities to do in the Saariselkä area here.

The cost of a bucket list Lapland winter break

So what is the cost of a Lapland bucket list holiday? I guess the answer is that it’s relative to everyone’s actual bucket list. For us, we wanted to experience as many activities as possible, while staying in unique accommodations that provided us with the best opportunities of seeing the Northern Lights. I am the type of traveller where I like to have my creature comforts on hand, so having resorts with lots of nearby facilities is important to my planning. Our trip to Lapland (in February 2019) cost us in the region of £2,500.00 per person. That included all the accommodation and activities listed above, as well as money for fuel and spending money for drinks, snacks and gifts.

This is the most I have ever spent on a single holiday by quite a long way, but I think the experiences and memories we made, make this a worthwhile cost. We saved for the best part of a year to be able to afford it, and I’d make the trip again in an instant. The majority of cost came from staying at Northern Lights Village and Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort. These are not cheap options, and there are plenty of other options in the area that are far more cost effective. You should question what exactly you want from the trip and what you consider the value of that to be. When staying in these types of resort, it’s important to remember that you are not paying for a luxury experience – you are paying for a unique experience in a beautiful part of the world.


What to pack for a Lapland winter break

I pondered for ages about what to pack for this trip. I worried I would get too cold and I really don’t like being cold. It makes me sulky and miserable. After much research I went out and did some clothes shopping, most of which was in Trespass or Decathlon. I didn’t buy the most expensive winter clothing, as I didn’t figure I’d get much use out of it afterwards, but it’s now all packed away for the next time I choose to visit the Arctic Circle or try my hand at skiing.

To keep warm when out during the daytime, in temperatures as low as -18C, this is what I would wear.

  1. Thermal base layer including long sleeve round neck top and full length bottoms.
  2. Polyester tracksuit bottoms.
  3. Ski Trousers
  4. Two pairs of woollen socks.
  5. Hiking boots.
  6. Thick woollen sweater.
  7. Ultra Lightweight Down Jacket with Hood.
  8. Woollen Hat
  9. Snood
  10. Thick Ski Gloves

That’s a lot of clothing, but it genuinely kept me quite toasty while I was out exploring. It’s important to cover up as much of your face while you are out. Despite it not feeling that cold, if you  left your face exposed for too long (maybe 10 minutes) you’d really feel the chill. I also carried a pair of fleece gloves so that I could swap them out to take photos. Have you ever tried using your camera with ski gloves? Not easy. I did pack a couple of pairs of jeans, of which I wore over the thermal base layer a couple of times in evenings but you’d get cold after about ten minutes outdoors. Basically, avoid denim and cotton clothing.

Keeping warm during a Lapland winter break

Keeping warm during a Lapland winter break

I’d also read up about stocking up on batteries for electronic equipment as they don’t cope so well in sub zero temperatures. I didn’t heed this advice due to cost. My camera, a Canon 7D Mark II, coped really well in the conditions. My GoPro, however, did not. There was much shutting down and re-starting so I missed the opportunity to get a lot of content. I’d packed a tripod, which is vital for shooting the Northern Lights, but that turned out not to be such a necessity for me sadly.
Have you ever visited Lapland in winter? Do you have any questions? Feel free to drop me a message if you have any queries that I can help with.

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6 Comments on “A one week, bucket list Lapland Winter Itinerary”

  1. I just loved my trip to Lapland earlier this year, and I’d totally go back and do yours too! The igloos look amazing and I could never get tired of that snowy scenery either (and I’ve got to give spotting the Northern Lights a second try too!).

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